Reblogged from the1nonlygayb  17,641 notes

dilfgod:

straight friend: aw I don’t understand why you’re still single

me: because approximately 8% of the us population identifies under the lgbtq community where 1.1% identifies as lesbian female, 3.5% as bisexual female, 1.7% as gay male, 1.1% as bisexual male, .3% as trans, and .3% as something else, then there’s finding someone who I’m compatible with emotionally, physically, and romantically from less than 8% of the population, and may or may not live near me

Reblogged from the1nonlygayb  8,722 notes

Depression is humiliating. It turns intelligent, kind people into zombies who can’t wash a dish or change their socks. It affects the ability to think clearly, to feel anything, to ascribe value to your children, your lifelong passions, your relative good fortune. It scoops out your normal healthy ability to cope with bad days and bad news, and replaces it with an unrecognizable sludge that finds no pleasure, no delight, no point in anything outside of bed. You alienate your friends because you can’t comport yourself socially, you risk your job because you can’t concentrate, you live in moderate squalor because you have no energy to stand up, let alone take out the garbage. You become pathetic and you know it. And you have no capacity to stop the downward plunge. You have no perspective, no emotional reserves, no faith that it will get better. So you feel guilty and ashamed of your inability to deal with life like a regular human, which exacerbates the depression and the isolation.
Depression is humiliating.
If you’ve never been depressed, thank your lucky stars and back off the folks who take a pill so they can make eye contact with the grocery store cashier. No one on earth would choose the nightmare of depression over an averagely turbulent normal life.
It’s not an incapacity to cope with day to day living in the modern world. It’s an incapacity to function. At all. If you and your loved ones have been spared, every blessing to you. If depression has taken root in you or your loved ones, every blessing to you, too.
Depression is humiliating.
No one chooses it. No one deserves it. It runs in families, it ruins families. You cannot imagine what it takes to feign normalcy, to show up to work, to make a dentist appointment, to pay bills, to walk your dog, to return library books on time, to keep enough toilet paper on hand, when you are exerting most of your capacity on trying not to kill yourself. Depression is real. Just because you’ve never had it doesn’t make it imaginary. Compassion is also real. And a depressed person may cling desperately to it until they are out of the woods and they may remember your compassion for the rest of their lives as a force greater than their depression. Have a heart. Judge not lest ye be judged. By Pearl (via psych2go)

Have compassion. Have heart. Don’t judge.

Reblogged from hyggehaven  908 notes
markscherz:

bookreada:

Can someone from the science side of Tumblr explain this?

Basically this argument uses a flawed understanding of (i) the process of evolution and (ii) the evolution of humans and other apes.
What you have to understand is that evolution does not mean that every individual of species A turns into species B over time, without any individuals of species A persisting - this is transmutation and, while it does occasionally happen, it is not the main mechanism of evolution. Rather, evolution works by gradual mutation and selection acting over time, such that species A at time 0 can give rise to species B at time N. It is possible for species B to arise from species A without species A having ever gone extinct - when this happens without any gene flow between the two populations, usually in some kind of geographic isolation, we call this ‘allopatric speciation’. It is equally possible for species A to give rise to species B and species C, while at the same time going extinct itself.
This means that if you trace lineages backward through time, they converge. Each convergence is the point where the two lineages have a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor (mrca) of a set of lineages is the most recent point at which all lineages were the same species.
Chimps, Gorillas, and other apes, are not our ancestors. Rather, they are other lineages that diverged from a common ancestor of our group. That common ancestor was an ape, but it was not an ape that is still around today. 
I hope that helped. If you have more questions, don’t hesitate to ask.
Yours sciencerely,
Mark Scherz
On behalf of the Science Side of Tumblr.


This should go viral

markscherz:

bookreada:

Can someone from the science side of Tumblr explain this?

Basically this argument uses a flawed understanding of (i) the process of evolution and (ii) the evolution of humans and other apes.

What you have to understand is that evolution does not mean that every individual of species A turns into species B over time, without any individuals of species A persisting - this is transmutation and, while it does occasionally happen, it is not the main mechanism of evolution. Rather, evolution works by gradual mutation and selection acting over time, such that species A at time 0 can give rise to species B at time N. It is possible for species B to arise from species A without species A having ever gone extinct - when this happens without any gene flow between the two populations, usually in some kind of geographic isolation, we call this ‘allopatric speciation’. It is equally possible for species A to give rise to species B and species C, while at the same time going extinct itself.

This means that if you trace lineages backward through time, they converge. Each convergence is the point where the two lineages have a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor (mrca) of a set of lineages is the most recent point at which all lineages were the same species.

Chimps, Gorillas, and other apes, are not our ancestors. Rather, they are other lineages that diverged from a common ancestor of our group. That common ancestor was an ape, but it was not an ape that is still around today. 

I hope that helped. If you have more questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

Yours sciencerely,

Mark Scherz

On behalf of the Science Side of Tumblr.

This should go viral